Two future presidents? Peter Morales gives invocation for Barack Obama in Golden, Colorado

September 16, 2008

Peter Morales gave the invocation at Barack Obama’s campaign event in Golden, Colorado!

Sunday morning, our Golden Obama office looked a bit like UU coffee hour: a quarter of the volunteers, or so it seemed, are also members at Jefferson Unitarian Church, and among the hundreds queuing up for tickets outside were many familiar faces (and I saw most of them again for the 11am service as the church was full!).
That’s where I first heard a rumor: 
Peter Morales had been asked to give the convocation for Barack Obama’s speech today at the Colorado School of Mines.
Low and behold, this morning it came to pass! 
Even though I have a deep dislike for linking politics and religion I’m very heartened by that decision by the Obama campaign to let a Unitarian Universalist minister invite the audience to reflection. What better religion to call for inclusiveness and openness! As you will see, Peter Morales had the courage of his conviction, calling faiths that preach hatred false! Thank you, Peter, for saying what few others dare to say.
Here’s my video: 
[blip.tv ?posts_id=1273224&dest=-1]
Here is Peter’s convocation transcribed from the video:
“As we gather today for a political event in a heated election season, at a time of great uncertainty in our nation, let us remind ourselves that we are one people – and here in Colorado: “Somos un pueblo!” In this troubled time, let us remember the lessons of all the great religious traditions, let us remember that the task of a leader is to serve the people.
All the great traditions – Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism – teach that we are all connected to each other. They teach us that we best demonstrate our religious faith by showing compassion for one another. If we are to be faithful, we are to help one another, we will work for justice, we will work for peace.
When God works through us, we will marginalize no one.
When we are truly faithful we will see that religion is what ties us together. Any faith that divides us, that creates enemies, that preaches hatred, is false.
Finally let us remember that being faithful to our ideals of peace and justice is far greater than this campaign: it’s the work of our lives. It’s easy to pray for peace and compassion and justice, [but] our faiths call us to do much more than pray with words.
Our lives speak much louder and more truthfully than our words. 
Oh, loving spirit, use us. Use us, guide us, give us courage. Our time demands courageous acts from each and everyone of us.
Let each of us say, in the words of the prophet Isaiah: Here I am, send me.
May it be so, amen.”